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TiffanyM

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #1 
My website was just copied....ugh!!!  It was the most personal of violations though because this woman, who copied several portions of my daycare website also copied my personal biography!!!  She removed my information including my name and high school, children's ages etc and inserted her own...the rest is my material and MY LIFE!!!!

My question is, can I use the © and ad a copyright to my website with out actually registering to discourage this from happening again?  I understand I wouldn't have any legal grounds but I'm just hoping to ward of any future offenders.
stapel

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Posts: 140
Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffanyM
My question is, can I use the � and ad a copyright to my website with out actually registering to discourage this from happening again?

You have, of course, taken the time to read the Copyscape FAQ and the information provided on Copyscape's "About Online Plagiarism" page. From which article or portion of text had you concluded that authors might not be "allowed" to express their rights to their copyrighted content until after they had registered those copyrights?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffanyM
I understand I wouldn't have any legal grounds but...

If you have created the content, on what basis have you concluded that you have no legal rights to it? If you have no legal rights to the content, on what basis do you plan to post a copyright notice?

Your statements regarding copyrights do not seem to match anything presented by the Copyscape site, the various other informational links provided by Copyscape, or indeed any resource with which I am familiar...? So I must be misunderstanding your meaning...?

Eliz.

TiffanyM

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stapel

If you have created the content, on what basis have you concluded that you have no legal rights to it? If you have no legal rights to the content, on what basis do you plan to post a copyright notice?


It is my original content but my limited understanding was that unless you have a registered copyright that you have no real legal rights to the content.  I'm not sure that I am understanding you either as I'm not very familiar with all of this.  Even if I don't have a registered copyright I still have legal rights to my content if someone were to plagiarize?  I've read through some of the information provided here on Copyspace but since I am investigating the ins & outs of copyrights for the first time I'm still very unfamiliar with it.

I followed the steps suggested by the site to contact the person and after two emails she has deleted the content that was copied.  I was able to resolve the problem quickly and easily but I want to avoid this from happening again if I can.

I guess my situation is that at this immediate time I do not intend to pursue a copyright but was interested in stating on my website that I do have one to deter others from copying my content.  Much like one would put an ADT sign in their front yard to ward off burglars but not actually have the alarm system installed...make sense?  I already have a  Copyspace banner but I'm referring to adding the familiar
© as another visual reminder to Not Copy.

I'm not sure that I have a question at all but was just wondering if this was a potential way to ward off offenders and if anyone had any insight to share regarding using a bogus copyright.

Thanks for your help.



stapel

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Posts: 140
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffanyM
...unless you have a registered copyright that you have no real legal rights to the content.

Your post almost sounds as though you haven't yet looked through the various resources provided online, including those provided by Copyscape...? For instance, your statement here regarding copyrights is directly contradicted by any number of articles, including this one, provided in a link by Copyscape. (If registration of one's copyright were required before the copyright being registered could exist, then citizens of countries such as the United Kingdom, in which there is no registration process, could never own copyrights. Obviously, this is not at all the case.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffanyM
I want to avoid this from happening again if I can.

As any number of articles, such as this one (provided by Copyscape), attest, you cannot "prevent" the copying of published material. You can only hope to retard the copying (by, for instance, p
osting a copyright notice, creating a "Terms of Use" page for your site, including the "©" symbol on your pages, or posting a Copyscape banner), and to combat the plagiarism once it is found.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffanyM
I do not intend to pursue a copyright...

I will guess that you mean that you have no intention of pursuing a registration of your copyright. This is unfortunate, due to the added protections provided by a registration, the utility with web hosts, and the bolstering of any legal claims (should your case reach court). But this is of course your choice; not everyone feels that the benefits outweigh the minor costs involved.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffanyM
[I]...was just wondering if...anyone had any insight to share regarding using a bogus copyright.

Please clarify what you mean by "using" a "bogus" copyright.

Eliz.

TiffanyM

Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #5 
My website involves my daycare business which includes my personal biography, experience and policies.  I had someone rip this off verbatim and post it in their Craigslist ad.  This was very frustrating after a lot of hard work spent developing my website.  I felt violated that someone would remove my personal information and replace it with theirs and copy my daycare description and philosophy and claim it as their own .  I'm not interested in pursuing a registered copyright immediately but am considering it for the future.  My hesitation is if someone did copy and refused to remove the content I don't know that I'd pursue legal action. 

Thanks for your effort in trying to explain but never mind.  I find your tone and manner in which you are trying to help demeaning. Sorry if I don't understand all the ins & outs, as I stated before I am in the very early stages of researching the copyright process so I apologize for my ignorance.

copyscape

copyscape
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Posts: 62
Reply with quote  #6 
No worries,

Copyright infringement happens to many people who have not had to deal with it before. Please feel free to ask any questions you want.

There are a number of online resources that may be helpful to get started, including:
http://www.copyscape.com/respond.php

Best,

Ben
(from copyscape)
TiffanyM

Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks Ben
pageonetech

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Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #8 
stapel, your posts in this thread have been unnecessarily condescending and unhelpful. Copyright law is a complicated matter that is difficult enough without there being widespread and commonly-held misunderstandings on how it works, and absolutely overwhelming when suddenly faced with it and having a short time to figure out what one's options are. Please consider being more understanding and helpful toward people who are confused and frightened.

That said, TiffanyM, the biggest misconception you seem to hold about copyright law is that for a copyright to exist and to be valid you need to register something. How it actually works is that the second you create anything of your own that is unique and falls under copyright (writing, drawings, music, etc.) it is legally yours. If you sketch a doodle on a napkin, you technically own the copyright. The only problem is, of course, if you intend to prove your copyright in a court of law you need solid evidence that your creation predates that of the plagarizer's, and obviously a registration is irrefutable proof of such. If you did decide to sue this person, without a registration you could likely use server logs or internet archive caches to prove you made the content and that it predates the unauthorized craigslist posting, but I am not a lawyer by any means so do not take that (or anything here) as solid legal advice.
TiffanyM

Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #9 
Thank you for your response pageonetech, what you just shared provided me with helpful information and clarified in a much simpler and friendly way my misconception.

I think I understand the process better now but have to say I was discouraged to find my site copied again just yesterday.  My entire Policy Page was copy & pasted by another person and used on her website.  I found it humorous however that she has her site copyrighted when it is MY material!!  I did send her an email requesting that she contact me for permission or change her content and haven't heard back.  What a PITA!!
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